Fluor support creates a variety of engineering and business pipelines – UofSC News & Events



Brend Chavis wants to follow in the footsteps of his father’s career, but wants to do it himself.

Chavis, Ph.D. A student at the College of Engineering and Computing says that part of his interest in the field, which he describes as using existing technology to develop new technology, was caused by his father and part by his own curiosity.

“My father works in technology, and I’ve always been very impressed with him and his work,” says Chavis. “It really was one of my influences when I chose what I wanted to do in my life. But I was always attracted to technology – computers. I was always a kid waiting in line for another new thing to show up.

He holds a bachelor’s degree in information systems from Mount St. At Mary’s University in Maryland and with a master’s degree in data analysis from North Carolina’s A&T, Chavis is studying for a doctoral program in computer science at UofSC and plans to graduate in 2023. December.

One of Chavis’ goals is to fund his own education, and thanks to programs funded by Fluor Corp., he does so.

Chavis funded and did an internship from Fluor through the Consortium for Master’s Studies in Engineering and Science Minorities (GEM) as well as through a doctoral scholarship awarded by BRIDGE to the National Science Foundation. Both programs aim to increase the number of under-represented minority graduates in engineering and other STEM fields.

In both cases, the programs help build a community of researchers and build networking opportunities.

“The bill should be closely tied to a community of like-minded thinkers,” Chavis says, adding that his father was also a member of GEM. “It simply came to our notice then. I have always wanted to be a person who can get a higher education.

The main goal of Fluor’s global university support programs at 33 colleges and universities around the world is to build a diverse pool of talent to meet future employment needs. South Carolina has been part of this program since 2010, but the university’s relationship with Fluor dates back to 1989.

The core course gives students the opportunity to learn about Fluor and to get to know it and their opportunities. Students with this experience are more competitive after graduation. Over the years, we have hired several UofSC students who are now volunteering to help a new circle of students.

Torrence Robinson, senior director of global community affairs and president of the Fluor Foundation

Fluor currently funds about $ 50,000 a year, which helps support several programs and student organizations in business and engineering schools. Fluor executives also serve on university advisory boards.

Other engineering programs supported by Fluor include the first generation and early summer program. At Darla Moore Business School, Fluor supports the Diversity and Inclusion Program, the Net Impact Club, the Welcome Back Business Bash, the Business Alumni and the Institute of Management Accountants.

“Value is a relationship, an opportunity to interact with faculty and students,” said Torrence Robinson, senior director of global community affairs and president of the Fluor Foundation. “We are focusing on supporting existing students to increase the number of graduates who will work not only in our core areas of engineering, procurement and construction, but also in other areas of applied science and business.

Robinson says about 100 of Fluor’s current employees are South Carolina graduates, including Zane Reed, in 1992. mechanical enginering. Reed, head of Fluor’s mechanical engineering division, also leads Fluor’s Capstone Senior Project, which brings together engineering students and Fluor staff to address real-world engineering challenges.

“The core course gives students the opportunity to learn about Fluor and to get to know them and their opportunities,” says Robinson. “Students with such experience are more competitive after graduation. Over the years, we have hired several UofSC students who are now volunteering their time to help a new circle of students.

Chavis also gained such experiential learning, as well as a GEM associate who recently worked at Johns Hopkins University’s Applied Physics Laboratory on a variety of projects.

“I have to do all the research I want to do. I can continue to improve by learning, ”says Chavis. “These scholarships have given me an opportunity I never thought I would have, and I can do it myself, and I’m really proud of that.


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Subject matter: Students, Alumni, Academics, Research, Scholarships, Studies, Partnerships, Careers, Student voices, College of Engineering and Computing

Godfrey Kemp

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